“Changing Lives” Gustavo Dudamel

“Changing Lives”  Gustavo Dudamel
Posted by on Feb 22, 2015

“Changing Lives” Gustavo Dudamel, is the story of this extraordinary conductor and the music education program, El Sistema, that led him to success.

When Gustavo Dudamel, at the age of twenty-eight, ascended the podium at the Hollywood Bowl for his inaugural concert as conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, he immediately captivated the hearts of his audience, just as he had the minds of music critics who designated him a modern-day Leonard Bernstein.

In Changing Lives, the maestro’s story becomes the entry point to an equally captivating subject: El Sistema, the music education program that nurtured his musical talent, first as a young violinist and then as a budding conductor under the mentorship of its founder, José Antonio Abreu. What began in Venezuela has now reached children in Los Angeles, New York City, Baltimore, and cities around the world. No matter the location, the overarching goal of El Sistema is unwavering: to rescue children from the depredations of poverty through music. Part history, part reportage, this book reveals that arts education can indeed effect positive social change.

Find Changing Lives now on Amazon.








Itzhak Perlman Talks Violin Technique

Itzhak Perlman Talks Violin Technique
Posted by on Jan 8, 2015

Itzhak Perlman Talks Violin Technique is a collection of videos in which he discusses all things related to violin technique. Watch Itzhak Perlman’s Youtube Channel.








Lang Lang gives a Master Class in Piano

Lang Lang gives a Master Class in Piano
Posted by on Dec 8, 2014

Lang Lang gave a master class in piano to some promising young pianists at the public conservatories of Madrid on December 10, 2012 in the auditorium at the Espacio Fundación Telefónica.”








Martha Argerich: Plays Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky

Martha Argerich: Plays Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky
Posted by on Nov 26, 2014

Martha Argerich Plays Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky. This remarkable DVD presents two unreleased performances filmed by BBC television in 1977: celebrated pianist Martha Argerich plays the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1, and Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3. Both pieces are technically demanding and prove to be an ideal vehicle for Argerich’s musical inspiration, demonstrating why she is hailed as one of the world’s leading musicians. She is joined by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra, Sir Charles Groves, and André Previn, in two powerhouse performances that offer a unique glimpse into our classical music heritage. Lovingly restored, using the finest state-of-the-art technology, the ‘classic archive’ series from IdealeAudience and EuroArts features great performances from legendary artists, offering a unique historical glimpse into our classical heritage.

Find Martha Argerich Plays Prokofiev and Tchaikovsky now on Amazon.








“The Audition” Metropolitan Opera’s National Auditions

“The Audition”   Metropolitan Opera’s National Auditions
Posted by on Nov 26, 2014

“The Audition” Metropolitan Opera’s National Auditions. Opera is an aging art form, as Met Opera honcho Peter Gelb points out to the successful candidates for the 2007 National Council Finals. And yet, in this riveting documentary, nearly a dozen men and women, most of whom are under the age of 30, have committed their lives to singing repertoire that is deeply out of fashion with most of their peers. And they do it – peerlessly. It’s a glimpse behind the scenes, literally, to the years of training that they have undergone and the 10 minutes or so they will have on stage that will make them or (possibly) break them.

Find The Audition now on Amazon.








“Bach: Music in the Castle of Heaven” John Eliot Gardiner

“Bach: Music in the Castle of Heaven”   John Eliot Gardiner
Posted by on Nov 26, 2014

Johann Sebastian Bach is one of the most unfathomable composers in the history of music. How can such sublime work have been produced by a man who (when we can discern his personality at all) seems so ordinary, so opaque — and occasionally so intemperate?

John Eliot Gardiner grew up passing one of the only two authentic portraits of Bach every morning and evening on the stairs of his parents’ house, where it hung for safety during World War II. He has been studying and performing Bach ever since, and is now regarded as one of the composer’s greatest living interpreters. The fruits of this lifetime’s immersion are distilled in this remarkable book, grounded in the most recent Bach scholarship but moving far beyond it, and explaining in wonderful detail the ideas on which Bach drew, how he worked, how his music is constructed, how it achieves its effects — and what it can tell us about Bach the man.

Gardiner’s background as a historian has encouraged him to search for ways in which scholarship and performance can cooperate and fruitfully coalesce. This has entailed piecing together the few biographical shards, scrutinizing the music, and watching for those instances when Bach’s personality seems to penetrate the fabric of his notation. Gardiner’s aim is “to give the reader a sense of inhabiting the same experiences and sensations that Bach might have had in the act of music-making. This, I try to show, can help us arrive at a more human likeness discernible in the closely related processes of composing and performing his music.”

It is very rare that such an accomplished performer of music should also be a considerable writer and thinker about it. John Eliot Gardiner takes us as deeply into Bach’s works and mind as perhaps words can. The result is a unique book about one of the greatest of all creative artists.

Find Bach: Music in the Castle of Heaven now on Amazon.